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Definitions of Standards

To learn about any particular SEMI Standard, click a link below.

SEMI E4:SECS-I

SEMI E4: SECS-I

Defines a serial-based (RS-232) communication handshake and transmission protocol. Originally developed for host-to-tool interactions, it is more frequently encountered within a tool, where the equipment control software needs to communicate with individual hardware components via their SECS-I interface. This standard describes connection and transaction procedures, as well as how communication failures should be handled. Once communication has been established, SECS-II messages can be exchanged between two entities.

SEMI E5:SECS-II

SEMI E5: SECS-II

A dictionary of messages that can be exchanged between a factory host and a tool, once the communication connection protocol has been established via SEMI E4 or SEMI E37. Messages (or “Functions”) are organized into different “Streams” of related capabilities, such as communications, data publication, job management, recipe management, etc.

This standard describes in detail the required message structure, the data items used within each message, expected responses, and possible exception scenarios. Most other standards depend on SEMI E5, since they specify the SECS-II messages and data items they rely upon. While SEMI E5 defines hundreds of messages, a tool typically implements only the messages required by the standards it plans to support. Some fabs also request support for custom SECS-II messages, beyond those defined in SEMI E5.

SEMI E30:GEM (Generic Equipment Model)

SEMI E30: GEM (Generic Equipment Model)

This is the golden standard for host-to-equipment communication, describing many of the basic capabilities that fabs expect tools to support: 

  • Establishing communications correctly with the factory host.
  • Determining who has control of the tool: the remote host or local operator.
  • Reporting of sensor data, state information, and processing results from the tool through Status Variables or Data Variables.
  • Raising Events to report on relevant equipment activities and Alarms to notify the host when an error scenario occurs.
  • Allowing the host to change equipment functionality by setting Equipment Constants.
  • Responding to Remote Commands sent by the host, for process control and material movement.
  • Host management of the library of Process Programs (recipes) on the equipment.

Other capabilities may be required by the fab as well, such as clock (time) management, a terminal view for local operators to send messages to host personnel, reporting on material movement, spooling SECS-II messages while communications are down, and monitoring trace data reported by the equipment.  While subsequent standards describe more sophisticated material handling and production control scenarios, they all rely upon the core capabilities described in SEMI E30, particularly alarm, event, and data publication.

SEMI E37:HSMS (High Speed Message Service)

SEMI E37: HSMS (High Speed Message Service)

Defines an Ethernet (TCP/IP) communication handshake and transmission protocol. This is the customary communication channel between a factory host and all the equipment it must connect with, via SECS-II messaging. The standard describes connection and transaction procedures, as well as how communication failures should be handled. Once communication has been established, SECS-II messages can be exchanged between two entities.

SEMI E39:Object Services

SEMI E39: Object Services

Provides the infrastructure for creating and deleting various kinds of “objects,” as well as querying or updating their attributes. This standard is leveraged by many newer standards, such as SEMI E87 (Carriers), SEMI E94 (Control Jobs), and SEMI E148 (TS-Clock), which need to represent many physical or logical components on the equipment, have sophisticated data requirements, and mandate specific behaviors or state models for each object instance. While some standards rely upon service-specific messages to interact with their objects, the generic Stream 14 Object Services messages described in this standard are often used instead.

SEMI E40:Process Job Management

SEMI E40: Process Job Management

Describes how Process Jobs can be used to initiate material processing on the equipment. A Process Job defines what material should be processed in the equipment, the order it should be processed in, and what Process Program (Recipe) should be used to process it. For tools that support process tuning, the factory host can specify recipe parameters as part of the job setup. Once a Process Job is defined, it can either start executing automatically once its material arrives at the tool and is available for processing, or the host can explicitly Start, Stop, Abort, Pause, or Resume the job. SEMI E40 Process Jobs are typically used in conjunction with SEMI E94 Control Jobs.

SEMI E82:Interbay/Intrabay AMHS SEM

SEMI E82: Interbay/Intrabay AMHS SEM 

This standard defines host interactions with AMHS transport mechanisms that are responsible for moving carriers between the various tools in the fab.  A series of remote commands are available for the host to initiate transferring carriers between source and destination ports using an automated vehicle. The standard describes in detail specific transfer scenarios, the data (variables, events, and alarms) the tool must report, and the valid activities can take place for the AMHS a whole, its individual vehicles, ports, and the carriers being moved between them.

SEMI E84:Carrier Handoff

SEMI E84: Carrier Handoff

Describes how automated carrier handoff should take place between the fab’s Automated Material Handling System (AMHS) and the equipment’s load ports, if using a SEMI E84 optical transducer (PIO). When the AMHS arrives at the tool, a series of optical signals are exchanged to confirm the tool is ready for carrier delivery or removal, then to track handoff progress and completion. Detailed scenarios prescribe the normal handoff sequence and acceptable responses to abnormal situations, defining all the signals and their usage. While the factory host is not directly responsible for the handoff sequence itself, it is triggered by the SEMI E87 material load/unload activities initiated by the host when a load port is operating in Auto mode.

SEMI E87:Carrier Management

SEMI E87: Carrier Management

Automated material management is critical for lights-out host control in a fabrication facility. This standard provides detailed guidelines for many different material handling variations and error scenarios that may occur. The carrier loading/unloading sequence can be initiated by the local operator or by the factory host through a series of Stream 3 messages. Substrates (wafers) can only be accessed for processing once the carrier holding them has been successfully loaded, and its CarrierID and slot map read and validated. Typically, once processing is complete, material is returned to its carrier, which can then be unloaded or used in subsequent processing requests. To ensure operator, material, and hardware safety, load port and carrier states are monitored closely and are used to orchestrate these complex handoff procedures. 

The SEMI E87 standard was designed to accommodate both Fixed Buffer tools (substrates are removed directly from carriers on external load ports) and Internal Buffer tools (carriers are brought into storage locations inside the tool before substrate access can begin). The standard can also be used whether material is delivered to the equipment by an operator, or via an Automated Material Handling System (AMHS), as described in SEMI E84.

SEMI E88:Stocker SEM

SEMI E88: Stocker SEM  

This standard defines host interactions with Stocker tools that provide long or short term storage for a number of carriers, in addition to the normal GEM interface the equipment must support. A series of remote commands are available for the host to initiate transferring carriers into, through, and out of the stocker via different input and output ports. The standard describes in detail specific transfer scenarios, the data (variables, events, and alarms) the tool must report, and the valid activities can take place for the stocker as a whole, its individual ports, stocker cranes, internal shelf locations, and the carriers being moved.

SEMI E90:Substrate Management

SEMI E90: Substrate Management

Once material has been successfully loaded onto a tool (typically following the SEMI E87 loading sequence), this standard describes how individual substrates are tracked as they move throughout the equipment. The equipment control software uses this information to ensure material safety as substrates are picked from/placed to their required locations. The host uses this information to determine the processing state of each substrate. Once material has completed processing and has moved to its final destination, it can either be moved out of the tool or used in a subsequent processing request.

SEMI E91:Prober SEM

SEMI E91: Prober SEM

This standard defines host interactions with Prober testing tools that perform electrical measurements on substrates, in addition to the regular GEM interface the equipment must support. A series of remote commands are available for the host to initiate and manage the Prober jobs used to take these measurements. The standard describes in detail specific processing scenarios, the data that must be reported when inspection is complete, process program requirements, and when different Prober job activities are valid, based on the overall tool state.

SEMI E94:Control Job Management

SEMI E94: Control Job Management

This standard was developed to provide a supervisory level of control for Process Jobs, giving hosts the ability to manage complex or repetitive processing scenarios. Control Jobs can contain multiple Process Jobs, which can be run in a specific order or be optimized for material throughput. As Control Jobs are defined, they are added to a queue; when a job reaches the top of the queue, it can begin executing if its material has arrived at the equipment and is available for processing. The factory host can either change the queue order to move priority jobs to the head of the queue, or explicitly Start, Stop, Abort, Pause, or Resume the head-of-queue job. Once processing is complete, Control Jobs can specify alternate material routing based on a predetermined plan or in response to processing results.

SEMI E109:Reticle and Pod Management

SEMI E109: Reticle and Pod Management  

Similar to SEMI E87, this standard describes the additional automated material handling scenarios that lithography, reticle inspection, and reticle stocker tools need to manage Pods (carriers) and the Reticles (substrates) within them. In addition to the typical loading/unloading scenarios for Fixed Buffer and Internal Buffer tools described by SEMI E87, SEMI E109 also encompasses locking and unlocking of pods. Once the pod loading sequence has completed successfully, reticles can be move through the tool via TransferJobs or explicit move instructions. Extra inspection and qualification data gathered for each reticle determines how long it may be used in production.

SEMI E116:Equipment Performance Tracking (EPT)

SEMI E116: Equipment Performance Tracking (EPT)

Tracks and reports equipment uptime vs. downtime in a straight-forward way, without requiring any operator input. EPT determines whether the entire tool -- or individual components, such as robots, load ports, process chambers – are either Busy (performing work), Idle (awaiting work), or Blocked (in an error condition). This data can be used by OEMs to identify areas where hardware performance or throughput can be improved, and by fabs to determine whether a tool is meeting its performance targets.

SEMI E120:Common Equipment Model (CEM)

SEMI E120: Common Equipment Model (CEM)

Specifies a consistent mechanism for modelling a piece of equipment with all its physical and logical components, so that it can be easily understood by the factory host. The physical components in a tool (e.g., LoadPorts, Process Chambers, Robots, Sensors) are organized into Modules, Subsystems, individual IO devices, and Material Locations; the logical components usually represent software modules used on the equipment (e.g., analysis engines, material managers).

This standard is part of the collection of standards that make up an EDA (Equipment Data Acquisition) or “Interface A” implementation. EDA is an alternate channel that equipment can use to publish data to any EDA data consumer/client such as the factory host, without using the SECS/GEM (SEMI E5 and SEMI E30) messaging infrastructure.

SEMI E121:XML Usage

SEMI E121: XML Usage

Describes the best practices when setting up the XML schemas used to represent a tool and all its components that has been modelled as an SEMI E120 / SEMI E125 CEM. Communication with an EDA data consumer/client (such as the factory host) is implemented via an XML/SOAP based interface, as described in SEMI E128.

This standard is part of the collection of standards that make up an EDA (Equipment Data Acquisition) or “Interface A” implementation. EDA is an alternate channel that equipment can use to publish data to any EDA data consumer/client such as the factory host, without using the SECS/GEM (SEMI E5 and SEMI E30) messaging infrastructure.

SEMI E122:Tester SEM

SEMI E122: Tester SEM 

This standard defines host interactions with testing tools that perform electrical tests on units, in addition to the normal GEM interface the equipment must support. A series of remote commands are available for the host to initiate and manage the testing activities on each virtual Tester in a piece of equipment. The standard describes in detail specific testing and data reporting scenarios, the data that must be reported when testing is complete (via standard variables, events, and pre-configured data log reports), process program requirements for configurable parameters when the recipe is selected, additional alarm management capabilities, and when different test activities and data logging are valid, based on the overall tool state.

SEMI E123:Handler SEM

SEMI E123: Handler SEM 

This standard defines host interactions with Handler tools that are responsible for moving and processing units packaged on leadframes, trays, tubes, etc., in addition to the regular GEM interface the equipment must support. A series of remote commands are available for the host to initiate loading material from the input media to the process sites, processing of the material, then sorting the material based on processing results. The standard describes in detail the data that must be reported when processing is complete (via standard variables and events), requirements for process program content, the ability to support configurable machine, site, and media-specific parameters when the recipe is selected, additional recipe validation, and when different processing activities are valid, based on the overall tool state.

SEMI E125:Equipment Self-Description

SEMI E125: Equipment Self-Description

While GEM defines how the equipment can report its data to the host, it is often unclear where the data is coming from. The CEM for a tool is self-describing: it is clear how all the components within it relate to each other. This makes it easier to identify what data is relevant for manual troubleshooting, process control, or automated diagnostics applications. SEMI E125 further mandates what information must be supplied for the parameters (variable data), exceptions (alarms), or events published by each component, as well as any objects or state machines they support -- either custom ones, or those required by other SEMI standards, such as the 300mm standards (SEMI E40, SEMI E87, SEMI E90, SEMI E94). This standard also describes how an EDA consumer/client can query this information from the tool.

SEMI E128:XML Message Structures

SEMI E128: XML Message Structures

This standard specifies the XML/SOAP message structures that should be used when exchanging EDA data between a tool and any system that is interested in this data (such as the factory host).  This includes establishing communications sessions, how requests for data should be structured, and the expected response structure from the tool.

This standard is part of the collection of standards that make up an EDA (Equipment Data Acquisition) or “Interface A” implementation. EDA is an alternate channel that equipment can use to publish data to any EDA data consumer/client such as the factory host, without using the SECS/GEM (SEMI E5 and SEMI E30) messaging infrastructure.

SEMI E130:300mm Prober CEM

SEMI E130: 300mm Prober CEM 

This standard defines host interactions with Prober testing tools that perform electrical measurements on units, when the tool provides a 300mm interface in addition to the normal GEM interface. This standard provides more sophisticated control over the testing process than the SEMI E91 standard. While Prober jobs are executed as normal SEMI E94 / SEMI E40 Control Jobs and Process Jobs, additional remote commands are available for moving substrates through the tool, moving the prober to specific locations on the substrate, and inspecting/cleaning the probe between measurements. The standard describes in detail specific processing scenarios and their relationship to Control Jobs and Process Jobs, the data that must be reported when testing is complete, process program requirements for configurable parameters when the job is defined, and when different movement, probe management, and testing activities are valid, based on the overall tool state.

SEMI E132:Client Authentication and Authorization

SEMI E132: Client Authentication and Authorization

This standard mandates how EDA data consumers/clients can obtain data from the equipment, addressing issues with simultaneous, multi-client requests for data and overall information security. The equipment can grant access control rights to specific clients, who can then establish an authenticated communication session and request data from the tool or perform interface discovery. The standard includes detailed scenarios, attributes, and states models required to support EDA client access.

This standard is part of the collection of standards that make up an EDA (Equipment Data Acquisition) or “Interface A” implementation. EDA is an alternate channel that equipment can use to publish data to any EDA data consumer/client such as the factory host, without using the SECS/GEM (SEMI E5 and SEMI E30) messaging infrastructure.

SEMI E134:Data Collection Management

SEMI E134: Data Collection Management

Because all equipment data is available through its self-describing Common Equipment Model (CEM), an EDA client can subscribe to the exact data it is interested in. This standard describes how EDA clients can set up Data Collection Plans (DCPs) that retrieve this information, either as trace data or event/alarm-based data. Once a DCPs is defined and activated, it can continuously collect data from the equipment; alternatively, EDA clients can request specific pieces of data on an as-needed basis. This standard includes detailed scenarios for managing DCPs and ensuring that equipment performance is not affected by the quantity of data being reported. 

This standard is part of the collection of standards that make up an EDA (Equipment Data Acquisition) or “Interface A” implementation. EDA is an alternate channel that equipment can use to publish data to any EDA data consumer/client such as the factory host, without using the SECS/GEM (SEMI E5 and SEMI E30) messaging infrastructure.

SEMI E138:XML Common Components

SEMI E138: XML Common Components

Describes the XML structure for representing errors and the parameter types, data types, and units for the actual data being reported by the equipment. Includes simple data types, mapping definitions between EDA and SECS-II data types, enumerations, and complex structure data types. Also specifies the acceptable XML schema file to use.

This standard is part of the collection of standards that make up an EDA (Equipment Data Acquisition) or “Interface A” implementation. EDA is an alternate channel that equipment can use to publish data to any EDA data consumer/client such as the factory host, without using the SECS/GEM (SEMI E5 and SEMI E30) messaging infrastructure.

SEMI E142:Substrate Mapping

SEMI E142: Substrate Mapping

Describes how the factory host and equipment can exchange substrate map data through a standard SECS/GEM interface, using typical GEM event reports and SEMI E39 object requests (Stream 14 messages). Each substrate map provides details about individual locations (units, cells, dies, etc.) on a substrate (wafer, tray, strip, etc.), such as their processing or analysis results or bin values.

SEMI E145:Measurement Unit Symbols in XML

SEMI E145: Measurement Unit Symbols in XML 

Describes the XML structure for representing units of measure, and lists the symbols to use for common measurement units, units sometimes used in semiconductor equipment, and rules for defining custom symbols that are unique to your equipment. Also specifies the acceptable XML schema file to use.

This standard is part of the collection of standards that make up an EDA (Equipment Data Acquisition) or “Interface A” implementation. EDA is an alternate channel that equipment can use to publish data to any EDA data consumer/client such as the factory host, without using the SECS/GEM (SEMI E5 and SEMI E30) messaging infrastructure.

SEMI E148:TS-Clock

SEMI E148: TS-Clock

This standard provides a more comprehensive approach to time management than the basic Clock capability described in the SEMI E30 (GEM) standard. Describes a network time synchronization protocol, an SEMI E39 Clock object whose attributes can be updated via standard Stream 14 messages, and a super-accurate 32-byte time format with a time zone designator.

SEMI E157:Module Process Tracking

SEMI E157: Module Process Tracking

Allows tools to report process-related data to the factory host on an ongoing basis, with enough detail that the information can be used to adjust process control and improve product quality or throughput. As each step in a process is started or completed in a chamber, the equipment can report relevant context data, such as the current recipe and step, recipe parameter values, calculated processing results, raw sensor data, etc. This standard describes the required state models, events, and data that must be made available, and how the data should be published via a SECS/GEM (SEMI E5 and SEMI E30) communication channel, or an EDA (SEMI E125 and SEMI E134) interface.

SEMI E164:EDA Common Metadata

SEMI E164: EDA Common Metadata

This standard is complimentary to the SEMI E125 standard, which outlines the XML format and metadata a tool can use to describe its CEM (Common Equipment Model), as specified in the SEMI E120 standard. SEMI E164 provides further guidelines on which data, events, state machines, and objects should be available through a tool’s EDA interface when it supports the GEM (SEMI E30), 300mm (SEMI E40, SEMI E87, SEMI E90, SEMI E94, SEMI E116), TS-Clock (SEMI E148), or Module Process Tracking (SEMI E157) standards. A consistent representation of this common data will allow EDA consumers/clients to create more generic data collection plans that should work across many different tool types, as long as the tool meets the SEMI E164 requirements.

SEMI G84:Strip Map Protocol

SEMI G84: Strip Map Protocol

Describes how the factory host and equipment can exchange strip map data through a standard SECS/GEM interface, using typical GEM event reports and SEMI E39 object requests (Stream 14 messages). Each strip map provides details about individual locations (units, cells, dies, etc.) on a substrate or strip, such as their processing or analysis results, grades, defect codes, or bin values.